Americans are accidentally throwing out their stimulus money because they look like junk mail.

Again.

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Last summer, Over four million Americans have received their economic impact payments from the CARES act via a VISA-branded debit card, and the card comes in a plain, white envelope with 'Money Network Cardholder Services' as the return address.

The same envelopes are making their way into people's mailboxes again for this next round of stimulus payments -- and some are finding their way to trash bins again too.

The non-descript envelope containing a card most people aren't expecting -- previously stimulus payments were distributed via direct deposit or paper check -- and many Americans are confusing the debit cards for junk mail, or think it might be a scam.

The cards are real.

Marketwatch interviewed a Florida couple who accidentally cut the card up.

"Their neighbor also told the outlet that he found his prepaid debit card suspicious because it bore no official federal insignia, and the return address was in Omaha, Neb. “Doesn’t sound like the federal government to me,” he said.

If you haven't received a stimulus payment yet, be on the lookout for a debit card coming through the mail. As well, Marketwatch reports there are some fees associated with using the cards, depending on how you use them/types of transactions. And, there's a $7.50 fee if the card is lost and needs replacing.

See all the FAQs about the EIP debit cards here.

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