Every time we get to the middle of summer and feel the heat of humid and muggy temperatures, there are always people who complain about the hot weather. Then you have the people who say, "I know winter will be here before we know it, so I'm not ready to complain about the heat."

Here in Western New York, we know that winter can bring some pretty unpleasant weather, although not all winters are created equal. Some are pretty mild, but others can be very snowy and cold -- even more than normal.

There are already signs and predictions that could very well be the case for the 2021-2022 winter season.

According to WGRZ, there has been a La Nina Watch issued by the Climate Prediction Center for the Northern Hemisphere for this fall and winter. There's a 66 percent chance that a La Nina could develop for the fall and winter.

This means that there could be cooler than normal sea surface temperatures for the equatorial Pacific Ocean for at least one month and can heavily impact weather in the Northern Hemisphere.

Typically, that means a colder and wetter winter for The Great Lakes and polar air reaching far down into The Great Lakes and the midwest United States.

According to Direct Weather, the early winter prediction is calling for colder than normal temperatures for The Great Lakes, along with above-average lake effect snow for Western New York. That would line up with the influence of La Nina.

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This would mean arctic air blasts and storms would impact the northeast for the fall and winter if these predictions hold up.

I'm sure many are hoping this does not happen and we don't have above-average snow and below-average temperatures this winter. Then again, I'm sure there are some who will be happy because that means better conditions for the slopes and hey, who doesn't want snow for the holidays?

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