One thing nearly all of us have done over the last few years is work from home.  The pandemic forced employers to rethink the way they did business. With the new age of working from home, a majority of New Yorkers have never done one thing that used to be commonplace.

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So much has changed in the world since the Coronavirus Pandemic became worldwide news in early 2020.  Most of us packed up our essentials from our offices and embarked on a new world order of working from home in our sweatpants and hoodies.

By now we are all well too familiar with jumping on a Zoom or Teams meeting, in place of trudging down to the conference room for a meeting that in all likelihood could have been an email. But as the pandemic wore on, one thing that was missing from the workday was gathering around the water cooler to talk about the Bills game on a Monday or grabbing a coffee in the afternoon with a co-worker.  Things that we took for granted in a pre-pandemic world, just weren't happening anymore.

And now, a new study has found that hundreds of thousands of workers who have started new jobs since the beginning of the pandemic have never had these experiences.  The reason?  They have never met their co-worker's face to face.

The website GreenBuildingElements.com conducted a study that looked at over 4,000 employees that started a new Work From Home job since the pandemic, and found that over half of them (57%) in New York have never met their coworkers in person.

It's crazy to think, that if someone told you in 2019 when you were starting a new job that you never would actually meet your colleagues face to face, you would have never believed it.

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